TIGERFLEET NEWS

Cyber Security

Cyber Security Tips and AdviceThe following content is based around the Small Business Cyber Guide and the Easy Steps Checklist pubslished by the Australian Cyber Security Centre. For more comprehensive information visit www.cyber.gov.auOn 6 August 2020, the...

Recent NSW Work Health & Safety Law Reforms

Recent NSW Work Health & Safety Law Reforms The NSW Work Health and Safety Act 2011 was amended on 10 June 2020 [Amendment (Review) Bill 2020 (NSW)], with a number of significant reforms introduced.  The key changes to the WHS Act include: The introduction of a...

Vehicle Daily Checks

Vehicle Daily Checks The operator of a heavy vehicle is responsible for ensuring that each vehicle is roadworthy. A daily check is a quick visual inspection that can be undertaken on a heavy vehicle prior to leaving the yard, depot or rest area. The NHVR have released...

Coronavirus Detection and Prevention

Coronavirus Detection and Prevention Information from NSW Department of Health and the World Health OrganisationSymptoms of COVID-19Symptoms of COVID-19 include fever, cough, runny nose and shortness of breath. In more severe cases, infection can cause pneumonia with...

Peace of Mind (Part 3) – Why TigerFleet?

Peace of Mind (Part 3) – Why TigerFleet? TigerFleet is a leading fleet management and compliance tool, with over 20 years of consultative development between industry experts and a range of transport companies. Our software platform has evolved to become a market...

Peace of Mind (Part 2) – Understanding Cloud Technology

Peace of Mind (Part 2) – Understanding Cloud Technology In part one of this discussion on data protection and technology we looked at some of the ways that you can protect your personal data while browsing the internet and shopping online. This part looks at the shift...

Peace of Mind (Part 1) – Protect Yourself and Your Data

Peace of Mind (Part 1) – Protect Yourself and Your Data Our personal data is everywhere, and we can no longer afford to be blasé about our data security – if we are not taking proactive measures to prevent the use of our personal information, we are opening ourselves...

Notes Screen Searchable

Notes Screen Searchable Did you know that the notes you make in the TigerFleet Management Vehicle's and Employee's Notes screens are now searchable?    We thought that this would be a great place to store all of the information that just doesn't have anywhere else to...

2020 Vision

2020 Vision Wow! January is already over – only 11 months left in 2020, so we had better get cracking! Before we do though, we would like to take a moment to reflect on the turbulent times that Australia has faced since the end of 2019. We have seen terrible bushfires...

Trailer Tracking That Works

Trailer Tracking That Works Transform Data From Your Fleet Of Trailers Into Valuable Information To Help Your Company Make And Save Money Complete Visibility Into Real-Time Operations Designed specifically for trailers, our Wireless Links trailer tracking devices...

In addition to the existing vehicle management functionality, including service scheduling, fault reporting, repairs, inspections, tyre & brake replacement tracking, and the automated reminders for upcoming or overdue tasks related to these, TigerFleet has just added Defect Notice management to its platform.

Australia has around 600,000 heavy vehicles registered nationwide, with around 200,000 of these in New South Wales.

During the June 2019 quarter 88,421 vehicles units were inspected for fatigue management compliance, valid registration and driver licences, outstanding defects, permit compliance, mass management and load restraints, and mechanical, steering and suspension condition. Of these 10,136 vehicles were issued a total of 12,749 defect notices. Around 72% of these were minor defects, 17.5% were formal warning defects, 10% were major defects and .5% resulted in vehicles being grounded (see Table 1).

Vehicles were also inspected as part of the Heavy Vehicle Inspection Scheme (HVIS), which inspects for roadworthiness and vehicle standards for registration renewal. Of the 24,237 vehicles inspected 11,419 defect notices were issued, with a compliance rate of just 55.1% (See Table 2).

Table 1. Breakdown of vehicles inspected, notices issued and compliance rates for the past 5 quarters. (Data courtesy of NSW Roads and Maritime Service)

Table 2. Comparison of enforcement programs. The compliance rate of vehicles inspected at Heavy Vehicle Inspection Scheme (HVIS) is lower compared to other enforcement programs because the vehicle inspection for roadworthiness and registration is more comprehensive than inspection at a Heavy Vehicle Safety Station. . (Data courtesy of NSW Roads and Maritime Service)

What are your obligations?

In summary, under Chain of Responsibility (CoR), the maintenance obligations of all parties include:

  • Parties must not use, or permit another person to use a heavy vehicle on the road that is unsafe.
  • Parties must not use, or permit another person to use a heavy vehicle that does not conform to an applicable heavy vehicle standard. Heavy vehicle standards arise under the Australian Design Rules and the Heavy Vehicle (Vehicle Standards) National Regulation, which set out various vehicle standards, including general safety requirements such as those relating to steering, tyres and vehicle configuration.

An operator’s responsibilities include:

  • Having an effective Maintenance Management Systems.
  • Ensuring that heavy vehicles are regularly maintained to manufacturer’s standards and inspected in accordance with the applicable heavy vehicle standards (further information can be found at https://www.nhvr.gov.au/safety-accreditation-compliance/vehicle-standards-and-modifications/national-heavy-vehicle-inspection-manual)
  • If a roadworthiness defect is detected, prohibiting the defective vehicle to be used until the defect is rectified and the vehicle is roadworthy.
  • As a minimum, daily checks should include:
  • brakes,
  • lights and reflectors,
  • windows,
  • mirrors and wipers,
  • structure and bodywork,
  • engine,
  • driveline and
  • exhaust

A driver’s responsibilities include:

  • Performing daily checks of the vehicles they are operating.
  • Notifying the operator of any heavy vehicle defect
  • Not driving a heavy vehicle with a current defect that affects safety and roadworthiness.

What penalties are involved?

Under the HVNL, the maximum penalty for a business that permits an unsafe vehicle to be used is $30,000. Jail terms have been imposed on company owners that send drivers out in vehicles that are not roadworthy, including a recent (2017) in South Australia where a 12 year sentence was handed down for offences including endangering life and manslaughter.

Are you compliant?

Check out the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator

Find out More

Follow these links to find out more about TigerFleet’s Management and Tracking software and request your FREE 14 day trial at any time.

You can also take a deeper look at the TigerFleet Management software functionality on YouTube

Disclaimer: TigerFleet has taken due care and diligence in researching the information contained above, using only reliable sources, however cannot be responsible for inaccuracies contained within source data.